Here's The Future

Amazon Music is now available for Android and iOS in India

Code Bytes: Will you be interested in paying for music? This question would have raised eyebrows of our fellow countrymen few years back. However, we have knowingly or unknowingly started paying for music and in fact, we have started streaming music. Almost every major telecom service provider in the country now offers a music streaming platform totally free as part of your subscription. Airtel has one called Wynk Music, Reliance Jio has one called Jio Music and Vodafone offers similar benefit with Vodafone Play. But the music streaming industry is dominated by names such as Times Internet’s Gaana, Saavn, and Apple Music to name a few.

The launch of Amazon Music in India comes at a time when Spotify filed for IPO and set up its office in India. It also coincides with a new round of funding where Gaana raised around $115 million for expansion. Amazon Music does have some tricks up its sleeve, which could be one of the main reasons to get or switch to the service.

Getting started with Amazon Prime Music

Amazon Music has been in testing in India for the past few weeks, but it needed an Echo smart speaker and worked only via voice query. The service is now available as a standalone app for Android, iOS, Fire TV and even web.

Prime subscribers simply need to download the app and if you already have Amazon Shopping or Prime Video app installed then it will automatically recognize your account and then you need to tap the ‘Get Started’ button.

Once you are signed in, the first page is the language selection page. Amazon Music supports 12 languages – Hindi, English, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Bengali, Bhojpuri, Gujarati and Rajasthani. While most music streaming platforms use language and genre as a filter to show music, Amazon says the language selection here is not a filter.

“Over the past few years, we have identified that most users select 2-3 languages and hence we don’t use language as a filter,” said Sahas Malhotra, Director, Amazon Music India said.

This is key since Amazon wants it’s users to discover new music and not just stay listening to same set of music over time and again. Once the language selection is done, it is basically a grid of tiles varying in dimensions that offer access to music. “Content is the king and we have put content right at the centre,” adds Saras. Amazon says it has designed the app to be minimalist and ensure there is no friction when users look up for their music.

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